Loss Prevention Media

Breaking News in the Industry: April 24, 2018

Suspect in multi-million dollar credit card fraud ring arrested

A suspect in 48 credit/debit card fraud cases has been arrested in Miami, according to the Pasco County Sheriff’s Office. Daniel Santos, 22, was arrested through a coordinated effort with the U.S. Marshalls Service and the Miami Dade County Police. Santos is currently held on no bond. He is charged with organized fraud and possession of stolen credit or debit card, among other related charges. Pasco deputies said Santos also has a history of violence to include battery, throwing a deadly missile, felon in possession of a firearm, lewd and lascivious sexual battery on a victim under 16, assault on law enforcement, fleeing to elude, and multiple drug arrests. Santos’ fraud crimes have been occurring since March 2015. Deputies said Santos obtains credit/debit cards by either buying them from people, stealing them, or obtaining them through “mail box hopping.” His fraudulent activity with other criminal associates has become a multi-million dollar fraud ring.

Pasco sheriff’s Detective Spencer Hubbell received his first case as an Economic Crimes Unit detective in 2016, which was a Santos case. Over the course of the next year, he was assigned numerous other fraud cases. Hubbell was able to link many of the cases together as being committed by Santos. Hubbell arrested Santos several times since receiving the first case, however, Santos was always able to make bond and continue his lifestyle of criminal activity, deputies said. With a total of 48 fraud cases, Hubbell said he was determined to locate Santos and put a stop to his crime spree. During the past week, Hubbell and Pasco sheriff’s Detective Darren Hill put their computer skills to use to locate where Santos was hiding, as Santos knew there were active warrants for his arrest. These detectives watched Internet videos Santos posted and noted specific geographical details regarding the surroundings where Santos was hiding. They were able to successfully identify the exact condominium building seen in the videos. That led to Santos’ arrest.   [Source: Tampa Bay Reporter]

Customer captures Apple store grab and run on smartphone [Viral Video]

Like other large retail outlets, Apple stores have their fair share of thefts, but it’s not often that such incidents are caught on a customer’s smartphone. Police are investigating a robbery that took place at one of the Cupertino company’s stores on the Plaza in Kansas City. One shopper, Margs Dickinson, managed to capture the crime while she was in the store buying an Apple Watch. She later posted the video on her Facebook page. Dickenson told the Kansas City Star that she happened to have her phone out and started recording on SnapChat. The three men are seen grabbing devices from the store as the alarms ring. It appears that one of them is holding an iPad—possibly an expensive 12.9-inch Pro, judging from its size. There’s also a tether dragging along the floor, which could have been what set the alarms off. The men then grab a number of iPhones before fleeing the scene on foot. Back in 2016, Apple started removing the security cords on its iPhones in a small number of stores in the UK and Canada. The untethered handsets have a ‘kill-switch’ that mean when they leave the outlet’s WiFi range, they can’t do anything but ring for Find My iPhone until the battery dies. They are also Activation Locked using iCloud as a deterrent. The thefts were a lot more brazen than a technique used a couple of years ago, which involved criminals wearing blue shirts like those worn by Apple store workers and posing as employees, enabling them to stealing goods from the stores. Anyone who has information on the robbery should call the TIPS Hotline at 816.474.TIPS.  [Source: TechSpot]

Fraudster pleads guilty to $179K credit card fraud scheme

A 22-year-old Queens, New York man pleaded guilty to his role in a $179,000 credit card fraud scheme that spanned the East Coast, federal prosecutors said Thursday. Xia Bin Xu, of Bayside, was part of a fraud ring that stole credit card information from more than 100 cardholders to create fake credit cards, which they used to buy luxury goods from retail shops up and down the East Coast and sell them on the black market from July 2014 to April 2015, court records show. The scheme was headed by two Flushing men – ringleader Mei Bao Lu and his second-in-command Yang-Shi Lin – who skimmed credit card information from dozens of cardholders to create fake credit cards, said U.S. District Attorney John Durham. Lu distributed the fake credit cards to several “buyers” – including Xu – with instructions to purchase gift cards and luxury merchandise. He then sold the goods at a discount to be put on the black market, Durham said. The group used 120 counterfeit credit cards – issued by 18 unknowing financial institutions – to make around $179,000 fraudulent purchases in Connecticut, Florida, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, court records show. In addition to being a buyer, Xu recruited other members to buy for the fraud ring, Durham said.

Cops began investigating the scheme in February 2015 when Connecticut police departments began receiving complaints about unauthorized charges to their credit and debit cards, court records show. The investigation found many of the fraud complaints came from people who’d dined in the same Clinton, Connecticut restaurant earlier that month, authorities said.  Xu was arrested on Sept. 10, 2015 for his role in the credit card fraud scheme and later released on bond. On Wednesday, he pleaded guilty in a Connecticut federal court to one count of access device fraud. He will be sentenced to up to 10 years in prison for the crime on July 24. Xu was one of several members of Lu’s group to be convicted on similar credit-card related charges in Maine, New Jersey, New York and West Virginia state and federal courts. Lu and Lin also pleaded guilty to similar charges and were sentenced in early February – Lu to a year and a half in prison and Lin to a year and a day.   [Source: Bayside Patch]

Employee charged with theft from cash registers

Franco Smith, 18, of the 300 block of Englewood Avenue, Bellwood, Illinois, was charged with misdemeanor theft after an internal investigation at Home Depot,  where he worked, found he had stolen as much as $1,750 from various cash registers over a three-month period, police said. He is to appear for a hearing May 15 in Maybrook Court.  [Source: Chicago Tribune]

Woman charged in $7,000 Victoria’s Secret underwear theft

A California woman who allegedly stole more than $7,000 in underwear and other merchandise from Victoria’s Secret was captured by Medford, Oregon, police after she took a cab to her motel room. Harmonie Jewel Taylor, 25, faces two felony theft charges in Jackson County Circuit Court, accusing her of shoplifting more than $7,000 worth of merchandise from Victoria’s Secret at Rogue Valley Mall early Wednesday afternoon, then taking about $3,500 worth of items from Safeway stores later that evening, according to court documents filed in her case. At about 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, surveillance video at the lingerie chain allegedly showed Taylor filling several bags with underwear, according to Medford police. Mall security attempted to stop her, but she was able to flee the parking lot on foot, according to police. Taylor, who has a San Francisco address listed in court records, allegedly used a cab service to get from the mall to her motel room, court documents say. After obtaining surveillance photo stills from mall security, the cab company confirmed it gave a ride to a woman fitting Taylor’s description from the mall to the Motel 6 on Biddle Road, and motel staff identified her. At 9:18 p.m. Wednesday,

Medford police witnessed Taylor returning to her motel room via taxi, where she allegedly had in her possession two Victoria’s Secret bags filled with items taken from two Medford Safeway stores. The stolen merchandise, listed only as a “large amount of miscellaneous items” in Medford police reports, was valued at about $3,599. Taylor allegedly attempted to provide police with a false identity before her identity was confirmed through fingerprint records, according to court documents filed in the case. She has at least one California fugitive warrant charging her with robbery out of San Francisco. Taylor made her first court appearance Friday in the theft cases, along with the fugitive case. She remained in the Jackson County Jail without bail. A call to Medford police wasn’t immediately returned, but records show that Victoria’s Secret has been a frequent target of multi-thousand dollar thefts — with most going unsolved. In May of last year, about 130 bras were reported stolen from the store, amounting to losses valued at $7,854; another Medford case that same month reported quantities of bralettes, push-up bras and panties stolen, totaling $4,536. Similar Medford thefts involving thieves brazenly stealing armfuls of women’s underwear have been reported since at least 2015, according to previous news stories. Medford police have noted that company policies bar employees from physically stopping shoplifters. News stories in similar Victoria’s Secret thefts around the country also point to store layouts that place registers at the back of the store, rather than near the exit. [Source: Mail Tribune]

The post Breaking News in the Industry: April 24, 2018 appeared first on LPM.

Suspected Shoplifter Jumps into Car; Injures Police Officer

A suspected shoplifter who jumped into a car injured a police officer before driving out of the parking lot at Giant Eagle’s Market District store in Pittsburgh’s Shadyside neighborhood, police said. A cashier told the police officer assigned to work security detail at the grocery store near Centre and Negley avenues about a man believed to have been shoplifting, Department of Public Safety spokeswoman Alicia George said. The man was getting into his car when the officer approached him on foot. Then, the suspect began to drive away and struck the officer with an open car door, “throwing the officer to the ground,” George said. The officer, whose name was not released, suffered injuries to his hand and leg, according to George. He was taken to UPMC Mercy hospital, where he was “in good condition and receiving treatment.: Police are seeking the public’s help to identify and find the suspect involved in the incident. Officials did not provide a description of the suspect. They described the suspect’s getaway vehicle as a “newer model, maroon SUV” whose license plate ends with “1-9-3-3.” Police asked anyone with information to call detectives at 412.323.8800. Tips can remain anonymous.  [Source: Trib Live]

The post Suspected Shoplifter Jumps into Car; Injures Police Officer appeared first on LPM.

Loss Prevention Certification: Recently Certified – April 2018

Professional excellence requires dedication and responsibility, and is something that the best continuously strive to achieve. In order to maximize potential, it is essential that professional development is seen as an ongoing process. We should always be looking for ways to improve our skills, abilities, and base of knowledge as a means to maximize performance. Loss prevention certification is a means of establishing and validating that standard of excellence.

.inline-text-ad h1, .inline-text-ad h2, .inline-text-ad h3 { margin-top: 0; } .inline-text-ad h1 { font-size: 18px !important; font-weight: bold !important; } .inline-text-ad p { font-size: 1.0rem; } .inline-text-ad { border-top: 1px dotted #cccccc; border-bottom: 1px dotted #cccccc; padding-top: 20px; } @media only screen and (max-width: 768px) { .inline-text-ad { text-align: center; } .inline-text-ad h1, .inline-text-ad h3, .inline-text-ad h3 { font-size: 1.15em; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 460px) { .inline-text-ad h1, .inline-text-ad h3, .inline-text-ad h3 { font-size: 1em; } } Want an awesome LP career? Download this FREE Special Report, How to Find the Best Loss Prevention Jobs and Build a Successful Loss Prevention Career. The Loss Prevention Foundation Celebrates the Certified LP Professional

We are pleased to recognize and congratulate those industry leaders who recently obtained their LPC certification. Despite their demanding schedule and having other impressive educational credentials, they still saw the value and took the time to obtain this industry-leading LPC credential.

In order to achieve the highest standards of excellence, loss prevention professionals must embrace the importance of continuing education as a gateway to higher performance and achievement within the profession. The best way to invest in our future is to invest in ourselves, and each of us holds the responsibility to maximize our talents and abilities to best serve our professional ambitions.

Loss prevention certification is an investment that we make in ourselves. It is not simply a commitment to higher learning, but also a dedication to reach a higher standard. Each of these individuals is helping to raise the bar for the profession; and has earned both their designation and respect of the loss prevention community.

The Loss Prevention Foundation is pleased to recognize and congratulate the following individuals who have successfully completed all of the requirements set forth by the board of directors to be LPQualified (LPQ) and/or LPCertified (LPC):

Lucio Amicci, LPC Zone Manager, APP Sears Holdings Charles Bailey, Jr. LPC CFI Regional Asset Protection Manager Hibbett’s Sporting Goods Shawn Bradley, LPC Loss Prevention and Safety Manager Lowe’s David Chartrand, LPQ Area LP Manager Goodwill Industries of Seattle Miranda Collins, LPC Ecommerce Fraud Investigator PETCO Animal Supplies Michael D’Antonio, LPQ LP Manager Stew Leonard’s Darlene De Francesco, LPC Area Security & Loss Prevention Manager FedEx Office Nathan Dowling, LPQ Director of Surveillance & Security Buffalo Run Casino Nicholas Ferris, LPC Asset Protection District Manager Rite Aid Tyler Grandy, LPC Loss Prevention Analyst Dick’s Sporting Goods Michael Hawkins, LPC Loss Prevention Manager Lowe’s Aaron Henderson, LPC CFI Director Loss Prevention Penske Bruce Herritt, LPC Auto Center Manager Walmart Stores Ciera Hilton, LPQ Regional Loss Prevention Manager Protos Security Robert Jevarjian, LPQ LP Manager Stew Leonard’s Slade Jordan, LPC Asset Protection Coordinator Walmart Stores Arron Knight, LPC Regional EHS & Loss Prevention Manager FleetPride Erin Koons, LPQ AP Operations Manager Walmart Stores Lincoln LeFebvre, LPC Senior Manager – Field AP The Home Depot Alan Lott, LPC Project Manager Investigations 7-Eleven Kate McGorty, LPQ Loss Prevention Specialist L.L. Bean Kevin Mgrdichian, LPC District Loss Prevention Manager Sears Holdings Brian Naughton, LPQ Loss Prevention Ambassador Nordstrom Pankaj Patel, LPQ Loss Prevention Analyst Indigo Kelley Portner, LPQ Asset Protection District Manager Rite Aid R. Bryant Price, LPC Regional Director Loss Prevention Gabriel Brothers Donald Satterfield, LPC LP Process Mgr The Home Depot Steven Smith, LPC Area Loss Prevention Manager ULTA Beauty Steffen Steudte, LPQ Asset Protection Manager Sears Holdings Mandie Wells, LPQ Corporate LP Supervisor KPH Healthcare Services Ashley Winkelmann, LPC Corporate Investigator 7-Eleven

It is our responsibility to manage the process; driven by individual learning experiences and carrying a personal signature for success. Continuing education, training and skills development, lifelong learning activities, intellectual nourishment and exposure to new ideas all contribute to that plan. Are you taking the necessary steps?

To view the Recently Certified for March 2018, click here.

For more information on loss prevention certification and the certification process, contact the Loss Prevention Foundation at www.losspreventionfoundation.org.

The post Loss Prevention Certification: Recently Certified – April 2018 appeared first on LPM.

LPM Insider Survey: What Is the Greatest Public Misperception of ORC?

Organized retail crime and the dramatic growth of ORC incidents have drawn significant attention both within the loss prevention industry and throughout the retail community in general as businesses search for ways to manage the threats and address the issues.

Whether dealing directly with professional shoplifters or otherwise battling the related fencing operations, cargo theft incidents, Internet crimes, or other associated offenses, tremendous effort and resources are being waged against those associated with these sophisticated criminal networks.

Retailers have established dedicated task forces to specifically deal with ORC issues. Industry associations have invested significant resources to combat organized retail crime efforts through education, awareness, and political channels. Organized retail crime associations (ORCAs) have been founded across the country.

There are efforts to influence leaders on Capitol Hill to continue to search for legislative solutions, enact stronger statutes, increase penalties, and encourage enforcement. There are also sponsored events in select markets where professionals can learn and network with law enforcement agencies and other retailers to enhance engagement and build stronger partnerships.

.inline-text-ad h1, .inline-text-ad h2, .inline-text-ad h3 { margin-top: 0; } .inline-text-ad h1 { font-size: 18px !important; font-weight: bold !important; } .inline-text-ad p { font-size: 1.0rem; } .inline-text-ad { border-top: 1px dotted #cccccc; border-bottom: 1px dotted #cccccc; padding-top: 20px; } @media only screen and (max-width: 768px) { .inline-text-ad { text-align: center; } .inline-text-ad h1, .inline-text-ad h3, .inline-text-ad h3 { font-size: 1.15em; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 460px) { .inline-text-ad h1, .inline-text-ad h3, .inline-text-ad h3 { font-size: 1em; } }

Get the facts about shoplifting in our FREE Special Report,Tips on How to Stop Shoplifting:   What You Can Learn from Shoplifting Statistics, Organized Retail Crime Facts & Shoplifting Stories right now!

Yet despite these focused efforts, the public perception of organized retail crime is typically not viewed in the light that we might expect. Often perceived as a minor distraction in the larger scheme of things, theft and theft-related crimes—to include organized retail crime incidents—are not seen as a primary concern in the eyes of those outside of retail.

In the eyes of many, this is nothing more than a petty sidebar that pulls us away from other “real” or “more important” issues.

There’s often little or no separation between “minor” offenses and criminal networks. In fact, such perceptions can often spark sympathy for the perpetrators while ignoring larger concerns and the true impact of these crimes.

So how do we change this perception? What can we do to increase public awareness and influence a different way of thinking? Perhaps the starting point is to identify where the breakdown is taking place.

What do you think?

We look forward to your insights and opinions! Please feel free to candidly share your thoughts. All responses to the survey will remain anonymous.

Look for the results of the survey to appear in next Monday’s LPM Insider.

 

The post LPM Insider Survey: What Is the Greatest Public Misperception of ORC? appeared first on LPM.

Breaking News in the Industry: April 23, 2018

Retail fraud probes lead to organized crime charges

Six men have been arrested on organized crime charges and other felonies following months-long retail fraud investigations by police in Westland and Canton Township in Ohio. The arrests came in conjunction with the execution of search warrants in several communities, including Westland, Dearborn and Dearborn Heights, on Wednesday. Authorities say the defendants, five of whom were formally arraigned Friday, worked in local pawn shops and bought and then resold high-end merchandise that had been stolen from big-box stores such as Home Depot, Lowe’s and Target. Some are also accused of selling stolen goods on eBay. “The impact of these cases illustrates why the Wayne County Prosecutor’s Office is trying to form a business protection unit,” said county prosecutor Kym Worthy in a press release. Retail fraud increases the prices of goods and services as well as retailers’ insurance costs, Worthy said.  [Source: HomeTownLife]

Employee charged with felony retail theft

Bond was set at $2,000 for a Best Buy employee charged with taking 22 cellular phones from the Norridge, Illinois, store, after keying them out of the store’s inventory by designating them as “damaged write-off,” police said. Freddy Lopez, of the 2100 block of North Narragansett Avenue, Chicago, was charged April 10 with felony retail theft of merchandise over $500. He is due in court May 4. A manager told police the theft was brought to his attention by an operations manager, who informed him that around March 20, there was an inventory adjustment to damage write-off for an iPhone 8 not in the warehouse on the write-off pallet. The manager told police he pulled inventory adjustments keyed to “damage write-off” by Lopez from August 2017 to April 2018 and learned there were 22 cellphones, valued at $18,901.38, that were not accounted for in the write-off pallet. Lopez refused to answer questions in regards to the incident, police said.   [Source: Chicago Tribune]

Suspect charged with fake sportswear trafficking

A man from Round Rock, Texas, has been charged with selling more than $325,000 worth of counterfeit sports apparel on eBay. Authorities in Austin arrested 58-year-old Steve Kim on federal counterfeiting charges, including one count of conspiracy to defraud the US and one count of trafficking in counterfeit goods. According to the indictment, from January 2010 until June 2, 2017, Kim knowingly sold more than $325,000 worth of counterfeit sports apparel on eBay. A vast majority of the items was acquired in China and shipped to his home in Round Rock. Those items included National Basketball Association (NBA), Major League Baseball (MLB), National Football League (NFL), and National Hockey League (NHL) jerseys and hats. On June 2, 2017, federal and state authorities executed a search warrant at the defendant’s residence and seized more than 2,300 items bearing counterfeit markings to include NBA, MLB, NFL, NHL, Reebok, Louis Vuitton, New Era and others. Suggested retail value of the seized items exceeds $189,000. Upon conviction, Kim faces up to five years in federal prison on the conspiracy charge and up to ten years in federal prison on the counterfeit goods charge.  [Source: Securing Industry]

Shoplifting suspects scuffle with store owner [Viral Video]

A Boston wig store owner was dragged along the sidewalk after attempting to chase down shoplifting suspects. Surveillance video shows two people looking at wigs inside Wig World Boston in Downtown Crossing. When the store’s owner approached them, the pair ran. The owner of Wig World was then seen on cell phone video in a scuffle with the shoplifters, who drag him along the sidewalk and punch him. “When I asked if they needed help they just grabbed and ran,” said store owner James Han. “I didn’t want to fight them or hit them or anything so I just grabbed one of them.” Han says this is the third time the thieves have targeted the store. Two of those incidents happened just this week. Han suffered bruises and scrapes after the confrontation. He says he immediately contacted police. He’s hopeful the video will help police ID the suspects.   [Source: CBS Boston]

LP Worldwide: Samsung Galaxy S9 phones worth $1M stolen from airport

Three armed Brazilian robbers disguised as airport workers stole a huge shipment of Samsung Galaxy S9 phones worth $1 million  from Rio de Janeiro’s Galeão International Airport, reported Brazilian Globo television on Wednesday. Reports from Brazilian local media channels show that the theft took place last Sunday when the Galaxy S9 has been in pre-sales in the country since last month and were expected to be delivered to customers later this week. The CCTV footage posted by Rumble shows three armed robbers that were disguised as airport workers, wearing their uniforms and walked into the building, hiding their face from the camera and pointing at different boxes.

As per the news channels, the robbers stole around 1,000 units of the newly launched smartphone while threatening cargo terminal’s staff and locking up workers in a room and carrying on with the theft. The stolen shipment’s value has been estimated to be around $1 million. The report also suggested that the gang have been believed to hide the stolen shipment in the Mare, a huge, nearby Rio favela, or impoverished community. Head of security for the Rio transport businesses’ union, Colonel Venancio Moura exclaimed, “The three criminals easily got into the cargo terminal and stole a million dollars’ worth of latest generation cellphones,” adding that they entered the warehouse where the smartphones had arrived just a day before. Furthermore, police confirmed that they had initiated the incident but, no arrests have been made yet.  [Source: Business Recorder]

SunTrust said employee worked with outside criminal when info on 1.5M clients was breached

Accounts for as many as 1.5 million clients at SunTrust Banks may have been compromised after an employee stole client contact lists, the company said Friday. During an earnings call Friday morning, SunTrust CEO William Rogers said the employee, who has now left the company, was working with a criminal third party when the client contact lists were stolen. Information about clients that might have been exposed in the breach includes name, address, phone number and certain account balances. The contact lists did not include personally-identifying information such as Social Security numbers, account number, PIN, user ID, password, or driver’s license information, the bank said. “We apologize to clients who may have been affected by this. We have heightened our monitoring of accounts and increased other security measures. While we have not identified significant fraudulent activity, we will reinforce our promise to clients that they will not be held responsible for any loss on their accounts as a result,” Bill Rogers, SunTrust chairman and CEO, said in a statement. The Atlanta-based bank said it was working with outside experts and coordinating with law enforcement on the case.  [Source: USA Today]

The post Breaking News in the Industry: April 23, 2018 appeared first on LPM.

Former Marine Recovering after Being Shot by Shoplifter

Fresno, California, Police say a man and a woman entered the O’Reilly’s Auto Parts store on North Blackstone Ave in North Fresno just before ten on Thursday night. Two store employees observed the man lift a relatively inexpensive auto accessory and pass it to the woman.

The clerks confronted the couple at the door, and Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer says the argument led to a fight.

” That physical fight ultimately led out into the front of the store, and at one point, the male suspect pulled out a handgun from his waistband fired it one time and struck the store employee in the stomach.”

 The suspects drove away from the store in a black Audi.

 The victim, 38-year-old Steve Austin was rushed to the hospital.

His father Larry says he cried when he first learned his son, a Marine Corps veteran of Desert Storm had been shot.

 But, Larry said he was relieved when he learned the gunshot wound went clean through, and so far it looks like his son will recover.

 “When I saw him in the hospital bed I felt good because he looked normal.” 

Chief Dyer says it’s disturbing because now even some shoplifters must be considered possibly armed and dangerous.

 This is initially a shoplifting that turned into a violent crime which is not uncommon.” 

But Chief Dyer says surveillance cameras and other evidence have him believing the suspects will be caught.

”I am very confident we are going to be able to solve this case quickly and to be able to arrest the male and female responsible for this crime.” 

Larry Austin says doctors have told him his son Steve could soon be released from the hospital and be recovering at home.   [Source: ABC30 Action News]

The post Former Marine Recovering after Being Shot by Shoplifter appeared first on LPM.

LPM Survey Results: Most report they have been assaulted when attempting to apprehend a shoplifter

As part of last week’s LP Insider survey, we debated whether a loss prevention associate used excessive force in an encounter with a 16-year-old girl accused of shoplifting. The majority of those surveyed believed that the LP representative’s actions were justified based on the situation. Others believed that the LP representative should have allowed the shoplifter to leave when she resisted, and there were also a few respondents that felt that the actions of the LP representative were inappropriate.

While there may be some debate over how this particular situation was handled by the LP representative, another critical aspect of the incident involved the assault of the LP representative as he attempted to detain the shoplifter

The nature of the apprehension process always has the potential to lead to volatile situations. Yet despite employee training and company policies intended to mitigate these situations, incidents still occur on a regular and consistent basis that involve the assault of loss prevention professionals during the apprehension process—some leading to tragic results. Even for the most seasoned professionals, when shoplifters are faced with the threat of detainment and potential criminal charges, emotions can run high and individuals can be unpredictable.

Regardless of our current positions, most of those in loss prevention still have roots as representatives apprehending shoplifters. Has it ever happened to you?

.inline-text-ad h1, .inline-text-ad h2, .inline-text-ad h3 { margin-top: 0; } .inline-text-ad h1 { font-size: 18px !important; font-weight: bold !important; } .inline-text-ad p { font-size: 1.0rem; } .inline-text-ad { border-top: 1px dotted #cccccc; border-bottom: 1px dotted #cccccc; padding-top: 20px; } @media only screen and (max-width: 768px) { .inline-text-ad { text-align: center; } .inline-text-ad h1, .inline-text-ad h3, .inline-text-ad h3 { font-size: 1.15em; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 460px) { .inline-text-ad h1, .inline-text-ad h3, .inline-text-ad h3 { font-size: 1em; } }

Get the facts about shoplifting in our FREE Special Report,Tips on How to Stop Shoplifting:   What You Can Learn from Shoplifting Statistics, Organized Retail Crime Facts & Shoplifting Stories right now!

Survey Results

A large majority of our survey respondents (87 percent) claim that they have been assaulted when attempting to detain a shoplifter despite following company guidelines and training, with 24 percent saying they have been assaulted once and 63 percent revealing that they have been assaulted on multiple occasions.

Approximately 10 percent indicate that while there have been situations that could have escalated further, they have always been able to detain shoplifters without being assaulted. Another 3 percent state that if the situation escalated to where they thought violence may result, they simply let the shoplifter go

 

Here is a sampling of your comments:

“Despite using proper guidelines, I have been punched and bitten by shoplifters.”

“This could have been prevented if other employees who were watching alerted me to an accomplice who kicked me in the head while taking a suspect into custody.”

“Many shoplifters can be escorted inside without incident or simply by using a calm, respectful tone and talking to them all the way back to the office. This keeps their mind occupied and lessens the likelihood of an altercation. However, regardless of taking every precaution and treating the subject in a respectful way there are those that will fight, argue, scream, or do anything they can to get away or create a scene.”

“We have to expect and prepare for the worst with every apprehension to protect ourselves and others nearby but we must also take the high-road and give them the chance to comply without problems. Should they decide to fight with us we have to very quickly assess whether to continue with the apprehension, which may include a struggle to get them restrained, or to let them go. Many times it’s a split-second decision, so it’s best to think it through beforehand by asking yourself- ‘what if’ so that you are prepared or have back up support ready just in case.”

“Yes. Despite what some in corporate offices seem to believe – shoplifters don’t always disengage just because you do. Even after we have disengaged, we have had shoplifters follow us back into the building attempting to fight us on numerous occasions – even with no physical contact initiated on our part.”

“Company policies ‘back in the day’ encouraged stopping shoplifters via physical force. While holding shoplifter down on ground, he bit me so hard that I had to get a tetanus shot.”

“Based off of pure fear of liability, companies have ‘tempered’ the LP position and people committing the crime of theft, credit card fraud, burglary etc. know it! Police departments have raised the dollar amount for grand theft, and oftentimes refuse to take a case for what it is. That action is based off of keeping crime statistics low and the city doesn’t look like it has a high crime rate.”

“Yes, I have had a few violent encounters from ORC groups and drug addicts. This is why I got out of the Loss Prevention industry. I don’t mind going hands-on with a resisting subject, but the standards and protocols for ‘hands-on’ apprehension are too abstruse and ambiguous. It serves to protect the corporation as a whole; but throws the agent under the bus with any liability pursuits from the criminal. The executives are at the top of the echelon, sitting behind their desks stating, ‘Well, we trained them, they knew the procedures,’ are the same ones terminating you once a subject gets physical.”

Do you have any additional thoughts? Let us know what’s on your mind.

 

The post LPM Survey Results: Most report they have been assaulted when attempting to apprehend a shoplifter appeared first on LPM.

Breaking News in the Industry: April 20, 2018

Shoplifter goes berserk after store theft

Moises Cerda has had 15 mugshots taken at the Will County Jail since 2009. Will last week’s mugshot be his last? That remains to be seen. This time, the 26-year-old Joliet, Illinois, resident who lives in the 400 block of Harwood Street has landed in serious trouble with Will County’s criminal justice system. Last week, Cerda visited the Jewel-Osco on West Jefferson Street and tried to swipe a bottle of liquor, the criminal complaint states. But before Cerda made his way out of the store, the Jewel-Osco loss prevention team jumped in action. And that’s when Cerda put up a fight, according the criminal charges. Cerda is charged with striking one of the LP associates “about the neck” and also “about the body,” the complaint states. Cerda also “struck about the head” another Jewel-Osco loss prevention associate while that man “was detaining the defendant for an alleged commission of retail theft,” court documents state. Cerda finds himself charged with retail theft and three counts of aggravated battery. His bail has been set at $75,000. So far, Cerda has failed to come up with 10 percent to post bond. But if he does, a judge has told Cerda that he “shall have no contact with Jewel-Osco.”   [Source: Joliet Patch]

Suspect claims to be soldier about to be deployed, steals $100K diamond

A man walked into a Bellevue, Washington, jewelry store dressed in military fatigues and boots and told an employee he wanted to buy a diamond engagement ring for his new fiancée before being deployed. Shown a 5.54-carat, marquise-cut diamond worth $100,000, the man grabbed the stone, bolted out the door and made his getaway in an SUV, Bellevue police say. Thanks to fingerprints left on the store’s glass door after the February theft, police last week arrested a suspect, identified in charging papers as Arquae Kennedy, 26, of Vancouver, Washington. Kennedy, who was charged Monday with second-degree robbery, never served in the armed forces, according to Bellevue police and King County prosecutors. Kennedy is accused of walking into Diamonds Inc., a jewelry store on Main Street in Old Bellevue. He asked to see diamonds between 3 and 5 carats and was shown two rings, charging papers say. He then asked to see a bigger diamond, and the store’s owner showed him a loose stone in a small jar, according to the charges. As the owner explained the diamond’s price, Kennedy suddenly grabbed the jar and ran out the front door, the charges say. The owner and his son chased Kennedy as he ran until reaching a private drive, where an SUV drove up to them, charging papers say. The owner managed to grab hold of Kennedy’s jacket as Kennedy jumped into the SUV, the charges say.  The owner was dragged by the vehicle a short distance until Kennedy hit him, causing him to let go, say the charges, which note the store owner suffered a bloody nose, a cut lip, and scraped knuckles and knees.

A woman who was driving by and who witnessed the pursuit was able to provide police with a license plate number, which came back to a 2018 Mazda CX5 that had been rented by a man who did not match the description of the robbery suspect, say charging documents. An employee told officers the store’s windows had been professionally cleaned that morning and that she had just cleaned the glass door and display case before the theft. When police reviewed the store’s video-surveillance footage, officers noticed the thief had pushed the glass open as he fled. Latent fingerprints found on the glass were run through an FBI database and matched Kennedy’s fingerprints, say charging papers. The store employee and the owner’s son independently identified Kennedy from a police photo montage.  Bellevue police obtained a temporary arrest warrant for Kennedy and arrested him in Vancouver on Friday. Kennedy was booked into the Clark County Jail before being transported to the King County Jail on Monday, where he remains in lieu of $150,000 bail, jail and court records show. Kennedy’s alleged accomplice has not been identified and police have not recovered the stolen diamond, according to Bellevue police. [Source: The Seattle Times]

Subject accused of leaving store while wearing stolen items

A woman was taken into custody after allegedly taking clothing into a fitting room at a Target store in Bloomfield Township, MIchigan, and attempting to leave while wearing the items. Angela Marie Blackwell is charged with first-degree retail fraud. Police said a Target asset protection associate at the store on Telegraph Road saw Blackwell carry multiple items of clothing into a fitting room and was wearing the items when she walked out. The asset protection manager was notified who allegedly saw Blackwell put several items into her purse while shopping. Blackwell paid for several grocery items that were in her cart at the checkout. Police said Blackwell attempted to leave the store without paying for the clothing items, the concealed items in her purse and unpaid items in her cart.  The items totaled more than $1,600. Officers responded and Blackwell was taken into custody and was arraigned Tuesday and given a $10,000 bond.
    [Source: ClickOnDetroit]

Police searching for thieves who’ve stolen up to $60K in clothing from department stores [Viral Video]

Indianapolis Metropolitan police are asking for the public’s help in tracking down a thief and several accomplices who have allegedly stolen about $60,000 in clothing from area Macy’s stores over the last few months. “They’re just running in as fast as they can and grabbing as many clothes as they can in those designer aisles and designer areas of Macy’s and then running out,” said IMPD Detective Michael Schollmeier. Schollmeier says the thefts started back in December and have continued at the Macy’s stores at Castleton Square Mall and Glendale Town Center. Investigators believe the same man, working with different accomplices, has targeted the stores about 15 times. “The majority of the value of the hits are between $2,000 and $6,000 every time,” Schollmeier said. Surveillance videos show the primary suspect and an accomplice walking into Macy’s, grabbing stacks of clothing, then quickly walking out of the store to a red Pontiac waiting in the parking lot. The thieves are in the store no more than a couple minutes. “They’re in and out so fast, there’s been numerous times loss prevention has been in the store, but as soon as they see them come in, by the time they get to that corner of the store, they’ve already grabbed their stuff and left,” Schollmeier said.

One incident didn’t go so smoothly for the thieves. One surveillance video shows the suspects struggling to walk out with several expensive jackets that had been wired to the floor by Macy’s employees. “They wired all the jackets up and put security devices on them so if they did come in, they couldn’t take that whole rack of jackets,” Schollmeier said. “And sure enough, they came in and tried to take that whole rack of jackets.” “The wires caught them and they weren’t able to get the jackets,” Schollmeier continued. “But as you can see in the video, they put the jackets down and end up going out with several thousand dollars in Polo shirts.” On another day, a Macy’s employee recognized the primary suspect when he came into the store and followed him outside. “They were able to snap some cell phone pictures of the suspects, but they weren’t able to detain them,” Schollmeier said. The thieves appear to be targeting expensive, designer brand clothing like Polo Ralph Lauren, Nautica and others. “We assume, obviously, they’re selling the stuff. But we really don’t know at this point where the clothing is going.”  If the suspects are caught, they could face charges including felony theft, and corrupt business influence. Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 317.262.TIPS.  [Source: CBS4Indy]

Employee steals merchandise, threatens LP and security with a gun

Colorado prosecutors have until this afternoon to file charges against a JCPenny employee accused of stealing $99 worth of jeans from the store last month and threatening Greeley Mall employees with a gun. Loss prevention associates would later tell police they caught sight of Sergio Jimenez, 24, leave the JCPenny store on the afternoon of March 29 with two pairs of jeans he hadn’t paid for. The associates tried to stop him from leaving, but he broke free from their grasp. “I have a gun,” he said, according to the affidavit for his arrest, recently made public. Then he “reached in his back pocket and pulled out a black semiautomatic handgun and held it down at his own side as he backed away.” The associates stepped away after that, and Jimenez fled to a car in the parking lot, they said. About that time, two mall security officers saw Jimenez flee from the loss prevention associates. The two mall security guards dashed out a side door in an effort to cut off Jimenez’s escape into the parking lot. When they caught up with him, he also told them he had a gun, and the security guards “backed off for their safety.” Jimenez eluded police for the next few weeks. Then, on Tuesday, Evans officers responded to the 3400 block of Belmont Avenue. The caller reported giving a man a ride, but then said the man produced a gun and threatened to shoot the driver. When police arrived at the caller’s location, they found Jimenez sitting on the sidewalk. He had a black handgun on the pavement next to him, the report states. He was arrested and booked into the Weld County Jail without further incident on suspicion of multiple criminal charges, including aggravated robbery and menacing.   [Source: The Greeley Tribune]

Consumers warned to watch out for counterfeit dresses, apparel online

From wedding dresses to summer apparel, consumers planning to add new items to their wardrobes are being warned to watch out for knock-off brand name merchandise that is increasingly tricking online shoppers. A consumer group and a counterfeit goods investigator both say it’s not only unaware consumers and brands that lose out when knock-offs are sold, but the profits often support other illegal activities. Jigme Love, co-owner of the Vancouver-based luxury consignment retailer Mine & Yours, said she’s seen the counterfeiting of brand name apparel transition from predominantly bags and accessories to dresses and other clothing. The company has destroyed a number of clothing items over the years that, upon closer inspection, turned out to be fakes, costing the store, she said. “We’re really strict but it’s not a perfect science,” she said. The store has become more cautious when buying clothes and increasingly relies on a third-party authenticator to verify garments, a process they previously used only for bags, Love said. There’s also been a shift from counterfeiting common high-end names like Michael Kors to more coveted haute couture lines like Chanel, she said. With wedding and prom season fast-approaching, Evan Kelly with the Better Business Bureau of Mainland B.C. is reminding consumers to do their homework before investing in a deal that seems too good to be true. “When it comes to brand name clothing, nothing is off limits,” he said. “We’ve seen fake Vera Wang dresses, fake just about anything.” Lorne Lipkus, a Toronto lawyer and member of the Canadian Anti-Counterfeiting Network, said everyone loses when knock-off brands are sold. An estimated $20 billion to $30 billion in counterfeit consumer goods are sold in Canada every year, he said. “The counterfeiters don’t pay taxes, so we are supporting an endeavor that is not contributing to this wonderful society that we have,” he said.

While he’s seen production of counterfeit goods shut down by police over the years, he said 80 percent of the global trade comes from China, and it’s largely controlled by organized crime or terrorism groups. Kelly said consumers should know the websites and companies they’re dealing with, check reviews, and always pay by credit card or PayPal which offer added security. Traditional brick-and-mortar stores continue to be the safer bet for shopping, he said. Increasingly, Lipkus said fake goods sold online aren’t just appearing on unique or resale websites but are sold through social media sites, including Facebook and Instagram. Three years ago, Lipkus said his law firm Kestenberg Siegal Lipkus LLP only employed one part-time person to search out online sellers. Today, they have three full-time investigators dedicated to the issue. Love said shoppers looking for a designer second-hand wedding dress should ask for a copy of the receipt and then call the retailer to confirm the original purchase. “I’ve even seen fake receipts,” she said. Close inspection of the stitching of a garment, the fabric and the label can provide clues as to whether a product is the real deal, she added. Lipkus also encouraged shoppers who get scammed to contact the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre, which can investigate and provide support to someone trying to get their money refunded by a credit card provider.    [Source: The Colonist]

The post Breaking News in the Industry: April 20, 2018 appeared first on LPM.

LPF Swing for Certification Golf Event Adds Several New Sponsors

The Loss Prevention Foundation recently announced several new sponsors who have joined the growing list of supporters of the “Swing for Certification” golf tournament set for Sunday, June 10, at Bear Creek Golf Club in Dallas preceding the National Retail Federation (NRF) PROTECT conference June 11-13, 2018.

The event is open to all retailers and solution providers to benefit the LPF Scholarship Program for LP professionals who want to advance their careers through obtaining their LPQ or LPC certifications. Proceeds will also benefit industry charities, including the Loss Prevention Benevolent Fund and the USS Foundation, the legacy event sponsor.

The post LPF Swing for Certification Golf Event Adds Several New Sponsors appeared first on LPM.

Breaking News in the Industry: April 19, 2018

Employee accused of stealing nearly 2,000 hydrocodone pills pleads guilty

A man accused of stealing nearly 2,000 prescription pain pills from a drugstore where he worked pleaded guilty Tuesday and was placed on two years of probation. Sean Damiano, 26, of Woodstock, New York, admitted to unlawful possession of a controlled substance, with other related charges, including retail theft, dropped in exchange for the guilty plea. He also was sentenced to 30 days community service and ordered to pay fines. At the time of his arrest two years ago, authorities said that Damiano stole about 1,800 prescription hydrocodone pills, valued at about $1,770, while he was working as a pharmacy technician at a Woodstock Walgreens. The thefts occurred between October and December 2015, officials said.  [Source: Chicago Tribune]

Woman left baby in hot car while she shoplifted

A Fort Walton Beach, Florida, woman faces charges of child neglect and larceny after authorities say she shoplifted from a store after she left her child alone in a hot car. According to an Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office arrest report, Jeana Nielsen Barlas, 38, was arrested Monday after she was detained by a department store employee in Destin who allegedly caught her shoplifting. The loss prevention associate told deputies she saw Barlas enter the store and select several items, including shorts, baby clothes, baby items and water bottles worth $295 and try to leave the store without paying for them, the report said. The officer confronted Barlas at the door and escorted her to the loss prevention office, where he contacted the Sheriff’s Office. After being read her rights, Barlas admitted she intended to leave the store with the unpaid merchandise, according to her arrest report. A deputy was gathering Barlas’ information in his patrol car about 3 p.m. when dispatchers received a call from a worker at a nearby store that a child was locked in a gray Toyota passenger van, alone and crying. The employee said the car was not running and the windows were rolled down slightly. The deputy asked Barlas if she drove a gray passenger van, and she said she did, the report said. He then asked her if she left her baby unattended in the vehicle, and she said she did. The deputy drove to the store with Barlas in the back of the vehicle. When he arrived, Destin firefighters already were trying to open the van. The deputy saw the small child strapped into a car seat in the rear passenger seat. Barlas used her keys to unlock the van and remove the child. “It should be noted, the defendant did not advise anyone she left (redacted) in the vehicle when she entered the store as she was detained in the loss prevention office,” the deputy said in his report. ”(The child) was left in the vehicle unattended for approximately one hour from when she entered the store to when the life safety violation call was dispatched.” Temperatures Monday reached 75 degrees, according to AccuWeather. Experts say that within 15 minutes of being parked and turned off, temperatures inside cars become 20 to 30 degrees hotter than the temperature outside. Barlas was charged with leaving a child under the age of 6 unattended in a motor vehicle, child neglect without great bodily harm and larceny. She was booked into the Okaloosa County Jail and was released on her own recognizance, according to jail records. [Source: NWF Daily News]

Retail schemes a sore spot for NYPD, even as overall crime drops

As overall crime drops to record lows in the city, one nefarious type persists: organized retail crime. And despite its nonviolent name, it’s nothing to shrug at, law enforcement officials say. It’s particularly insidious and it’s been linked to gang activity — and even terrorism. Schemes, such as shoplifting huge amounts of merchandise and then returning the items for gift cards that can be traded for drugs, are extremely challenging for authorities to crack down on because they are often operated by extensive rings across city and state lines. On Tuesday, the NYPD hosted a conference of the Metro Organized Retail Crime Alliance, a public-private partnership, at the Police Academy in College Point, Queens. Regional law enforcement agencies, including the Jersey City and Nassau County police and the Ontario County Sheriff’s Office, attended, along with global and regional directors of asset protection and loss prevention from Target, Sephora, JC Penney and CVS .

“You’ve heard me talk before about the shootings and the violence in the city, but that’s not the entire picture of crime in New York City,” said Chief of Detectives Dermot Shea. “A segment of crime that we’ve seen growing in recent years is property crime, and it’s now making up about 45% of the index crime in New York City. This is not a small problem.” Organized retail crime costs the U.S. about $30 billion each year, according to the FBI. Special Agent Eric Ives called it a “gateway crime that often leads us to major crime rings that use the illicit proceeds to fund other crimes, such as organized crime activities, health care fraud, money laundering and potentially even terrorism.” “I don’t want to paint a picture of this as a one-time issue where somebody is going in to steal. That certainly occurs, because they’re on hard times,” Shea said. “But there is no doubt that there are very organized crews behind a significant portion of this.” The crime alliance allows the law and retailers to share intelligence, establish patterns and ultimately lead to more successful prosecutions.   [Source: NY Daily News]

Trump rips online retailers over ‘very unfair’ tax policies

Donald Trump on Tuesday complained about “unfair” tax laws that favor online retailers, as the Supreme Court hears arguments in a case over the subject. “States and Cities throughout our Country are being cheated and treated so badly by online retailers. Very unfair to traditional tax paying stores!” Trump tweeted. The Supreme Court on Tuesday heard oral arguments in the case of South Dakota v. Wayfair, which centers on a South Dakota law that requires certain out-of-state online retailers to collect the state’s sales taxes. South Dakota asked the Supreme Court to uphold its law and to overturn a 1992 ruling that prevents states from compelling businesses to remit their sales taxes unless the business has a physical presence in the jurisdiction. The state of South Dakota argued that it is losing out on significant sales tax revenue, and that the old law provides online retailers an advantage over brick-and-mortar stores inside state lines. Representatives for Wayfair argued that implementing the new law would increase sales tax costs and create barriers for small businesses looking to compete with larger retailers. Trump earlier this month attacked Amazon on Twitter, claiming that the online retailer was at fault for the U.S. Postal Service’s declining revenues. He has since commissioned a panel to examine the Post Service’s operations and business model.  [Source: The Hill]

Theft suspect pepper-sprays LP associate

Police are attempting to identify a suspect accused of pepper-spraying a loss prevention associate while fleeing after a retail theft. North Coventry Police in Pennsylvania are requesting the public’s help with identifying a suspect from a robbery at the Boscov’s located at the Coventry Mall. On April 14, officers responded to Boscov’s for a retail theft where the suspect fled the area after pepper-spraying a loss prevention associate. The suspect was last seen fleeing in a white sedan, possibly displaying a New York license plate. Anyone with information regarding the suspect’s identity is asked to contact the North Coventry Police Department at 610.323.8360.   [Source: Daily Local News]

Bon-Ton set to become the latest retailer to go out of business entirely

Retail’s bloodletting continues. Department store operator Bon-Ton Stores is heading to federal bankruptcy court on Wednesday where a judge is likely to accept a winning bid for the retailer from liquidators, paving the way for its different chains to start shutting down in the coming weeks. The winning bidder for the retailer’s assets, according to court documents filed with U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Wilmington, Del., came from a group of bondholders, as well as Great American Group and Tiger Capital Group, firms that specialize in winding down businesses. Bon-Ton operates a namesake chain as well as Carson’s, Younkers, and Elder-Beerman. In all, the company operates some 200 department stores, net of the 40 it closed earlier this year following its Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing in February. Bon-Ton CEO Bill Tracy, who told staff earlier this week to expect a shut down of the company in the coming weeks, said in a statement to Reuters on Tuesday that, “While we are disappointed by this outcome and tried very hard to identify bidders interested in operating the business as a going concern, we are committed to working constructively with the winning bidder.” The bankruptcy auction was a relatively quick one, lasting only one business day, according to court documents. The company, with a history going back to 1854, had expressed hope recently that two mall developers, already grappling with many retail bankruptcies in recent years that have created vacancies, as well as a private equity firm would come to the rescue and keep Bon-Ton going. Instead, it looks like it will be the latest retailer to close shop, following the liquidations of Toys ‘R’ Us (still ongoing), The Sports Authority, and HHGregg in the recent past. Bon-Ton faced similar problems to those that have hurt rivals like Macy’s and JCPenney, which have closed hundreds of stores, but proved less capable of adapting. Those chains reported modest sales increases during the recent holiday quarter, while Bon-Ton continued to implode.   [Source: Fortune]

The post Breaking News in the Industry: April 19, 2018 appeared first on LPM.

3 Indispensable Ideas for Your Retail Store Safety Checklist

For the third time, Sam’s Club has lost an appeal in a personal injury action that awarded a woman $1 million for injuries she sustained in a New Jersey store after being hit in the leg with a flatbed cart.

“Viewed in the light most favorable to plaintiff, the evidence makes clear plaintiff suffered disfiguring scarring, numbness, ongoing constant pain, and impairment of the use of her leg,” the New Jersey Appellate Division wrote in their February 2018 decision, Newton v. Sam’s Club. “Defendant has not clearly and convincingly established that the damage award is a miscarriage of justice. To be sure, this was a high verdict, but that does not mean it was excessive.”

.inline-text-ad h1, .inline-text-ad h2, .inline-text-ad h3 { margin-top: 0; } .inline-text-ad h1 { font-size: 18px !important; font-weight: bold !important; } .inline-text-ad p { font-size: 1.0rem; } .inline-text-ad { border-top: 1px dotted #cccccc; border-bottom: 1px dotted #cccccc; padding-top: 20px; } @media only screen and (max-width: 768px) { .inline-text-ad { text-align: center; } .inline-text-ad h1, .inline-text-ad h3, .inline-text-ad h3 { font-size: 1.15em; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 460px) { .inline-text-ad h1, .inline-text-ad h3, .inline-text-ad h3 { font-size: 1em; } } Find out what you need to know about modern retail security in a FREE Special Report, Retail Security and Safety: CCTV Surveillance Systems, Retail Alarm Systems, and Security Training, right now!

With such eye-popping verdicts still being handed out, retail store safety—and getting employees to follow all the steps on your retail store safety checklist—is critical. Even a small mistake, like the one that led to the million-dollar verdict against Sam’ Club, can be a costly. In the case, a 72-year-old woman was struck in the leg by a flatbed cart loaded with boxes of chicken wings pushed by another customer (which a Sam’s Club employee had retrieved for the customer).

How can a retail company reduce the risk of injuries? Such a question is clearly too simplistic to answer. What a retail organization can do to cut injuries depends on what it has already done, its risks, and where it is along the safety management continuum. But the question “what did you do to cut injuries?,” while unable to provide universally applicable answers, can help to highlight real-world examples of safety success.

We’ve researched the question and put it to a range of companies—and unearthed several ideas for addressing common safety challenges. Loss prevention executives may want to review these steps for a retail store safety checklist to see if any actions that other companies have found helpful might prevent their next injury-and perhaps a million-dollar jury award.

1. Identify new equipment as “not ready for use” until it receives the necessary “okays.” One director of health and safety thinks his company’s simple “red tag procedure” has helped to prevent equipment from posing an unnecessary workplace hazard. As soon as a piece of equipment comes into a facility, receives a modification, or moves from one department to another, it receives a red tag indicating that it is off limits until it receives the necessary signatures from personnel with the authority to sign off.

2. Don’t try to change workers’ minds until you know what’s in them. Anytime you provide a safety training session or try to implement new safety procedure, success is hit or miss unless you understand the way workers currently address the situation in question. “Giving information is like throwing spaghetti on the wall: you have no idea what will stick until after you’ve thrown it,” explained one safety training consultant.

LP directors must appreciate that workers currently live within a system and, even if it doesn’t work well, that a safety intervention is a disruption to that system. She says that workers do not make a decision to adopt new work methods based on the specific data or information they are given; rather, they decide based on how it applies to their values, beliefs, and history (the system). Retail safety leaders need to tailor safety training to that system if they want workers to incorporate the information when they are back performing their job duties.

3. Look for real-life training examples. After several hand injuries, including severe lacerations, tip amputations, and fractures, one company enlisted the victims of injuries to lead safety meetings and an open discussion on past incidents, nip and pinch points, and what the loss of a hand could mean to their lives and their families. “It was one of the most effective meetings that I’ve been involved in,” the safety director said, who added that they’ve conducted the same training without injured employees but that they had less impact.

Other companies said they drove safety success by…

  • Moving hazard warning signs and safety message signs around. After six months in a single location, a safety sign probably doesn’t even register with employees. If allowed, move such signs to a slightly different location so workers notice them again.
  • Giving employees education on how to adjust their office chairs. One company said they deployed a new line of highly adjustable office chairs for workers but found that many of them never changed the factory setting because they weren’t sure how to operate the controls.
  • Providing employees with an online portal where they can report safety problems, fill out reports, and make safety suggestions.
  • Providing a training feedback form at the conclusion of safety training. A safety director can’t know what works and what doesn’t without affording workers the opportunity to evaluate safety training programs.
  • Including safety performance data in each employee’s annual review.
  • Conducting a weekly safety teleconference with senior managers.
  • Assigning each new worker to a “safety buddy” for the first month of work.

The post 3 Indispensable Ideas for Your Retail Store Safety Checklist appeared first on LPM.

Holiday Shopping Habits Throw Off Our Supply Chain Objectives

Did you ever notice that stores see more foot traffic and retail sales increase around the holidays? Of course you did; that’s Retail 101. But how often do you think about the implications of holiday shopping patterns for other business areas in the retail organization–notably, the supply chain?

In the era of online shopping, we see that tremendous volume increases in the supply chain are occurring during the holiday season. Although the data for the 2017 season has not yet been released, it’s evident that the retail industry has in some ways failed to keep up with the latest holiday shopping trends.

Glenn Master, contributing writer, shares some thoughtful observations on this topic in an article, “The Fallout of Holiday Peak,” in the March-April 2018 issue of LP Magazine. Master points out three key areas where the industry is falling behind in meeting its supply chain objectives. The first area is in volume projections. From the article:

Most retailers have analytic models that produce estimated volume projections to determine the number of orders that will be passing through the supply-chain network. This information is passed on to contracted transportation providers, allowing them to plan for the staffing models necessary to handle the anticipated product volume.

Despite all the computer analytics being used, the one thing that cannot be easily forecasted is how online ordering can be affected by the unpredictability of human behavior. This is especially true from Thanksgiving Day through Cyber Monday. In talking with my loss prevention peers in both retail and transportation, consumer sentiment was grossly underestimated going into the 2017 holiday season. So regardless of the current political atmosphere, the Federal Reserve raising interest rates, or the potential that North Korea may launch a nuclear bomb, US consumers were ready to spend money this holiday season.

Learn more about the other two areas where retailers need to be stepping up their supply chain game in “The Fallout of Holiday Peak.”

You can also visit the Table of Contents for the March–April 2018 issue or register for a free subscription to the magazine. [Note: if you’re already a logged-in subscriber, the previous link will take you to the current issue instead.]

The post Holiday Shopping Habits Throw Off Our Supply Chain Objectives appeared first on LPM.

Breaking News in the Industry: April 18, 2018

Shoplifting crew strikes home improvement stores

Baltimore County Police say they cleared fifteen shoplifting incidents at home improvement stores involving an organized crew of criminals, and are asking for the public’s assistance in identifying two more of the suspects. Police say the two suspects pictured are associated with this shoplifting crew and were caught on surveillance camera taking tools from a Home Depot store in western Baltimore County. The suspects involved in this shoplifting crew have stolen in excess of $100,000 worth of tools, usually Dewalt or Milwaukee tool kits. While detectives have cleared fifteen cases from Baltimore County, there are at least forty documented cases involving this group of suspects spanning throughout Maryland and in Delaware. The suspects typically enter the stores, most commonly Home Depot or Lowe’s, in groups of 2 – 4 people and walk straight to the tool corral area, take easily carried tool kits, then walk together directly out of the store. Anyone who recognizes the two unidentified suspects or has any information on these crimes or additional suspects can contact police at 410-307-2020.  [Source: Fox5 News]

Starbucks says it will close its 8,000 company-owned stores in the US for one afternoon to educate employees about racial bias

The announcement follows an uproar over the arrest of two black men who were waiting for a friend at a Philadelphia Starbucks last week. The store manager called the police. “I’ve spent the last few days in Philadelphia with my leadership team listening to the community, learning what we did wrong and the steps we need to take to fix it,” Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson said in a statement. “While this is not limited to Starbucks, we’re committed to being a part of the solution,” he said. “Closing our stores for racial bias training is just one step in a journey that requires dedication from every level of our company and partnerships in our local communities.” Starbucks says the training will be developed with guidance from experts including former Attorney General Eric Holder.

Sherrilyn Ifill, the president of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, and Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, will also help design the program, as will executives from the Equal Justice Initiative and Demos, the progressive think tank. The experts will also review the effectiveness of the training, Starbucks said.  The two men entered the Starbucks on Thursday and asked to use to the bathroom. An employee told them it was only for paying customers. When they then sat in the store without ordering anything, the manager called police, and the men were arrested for trespassing. No charges were filed. Johnson met with the two men on Monday and apologized for how they were treated, a company spokesperson said. The company says the manager who called the police is no longer working at that store. Starbucks would not comment on other reports that she has left the company by mutual agreement. Separately, a Facebook video taken in January at a Starbucks in California shows a black customer saying that he was not allowed to use the bathroom when a white customer was. The racial bias training will be provided on May 29 to about 175,000 workers. [Source: CNN Money]

Ring worth $20,000 stolen from jewelry store; two men sought

Police were looking for two men Thursday after they stole a ring worth more than $20,000 from a Killeen, Texas, jewelry store. The theft was reported just after 1 p.m. Wednesday at the Zales store at 2100 W.S. Young Dr. The two men entered the store and requested to see the ring, police said. An employee allowed one of the two to look at the ring, and then both suspects ran, taking the ring with them. Both men were black and one was in his 20s with a small Afro and brown eyes. He was wearing a black and yellow jogging suit with a jaguar or lion logo on the front and back. The second was also in his 20s and has short black hair and brown eyes. He was wearing blue jeans, white shoes, a white tank top and a blue jean jacket with “Nicki Minaj” on the back. The two may have escaped in a white sedan. Investigators are asking anyone with information to call Crime Stoppers at (254) 526-TIPS.   [Source: KWTX10 News]

Teen employee charged with felony theft for returns scam

A 16-year-old girl was charged with felony theft Sunday after she allegedly stole merchandise and money from JCPenney over several months. According to a Galesburg, Illinois, police report, officers were called about 4 p.m. Sunday to the retail anchor at Sandburg Mall, 1150 W. Carl Sandburg Drive. Once there, a corporate loss prevention associate told police the teenage worker had been under investigation for a month for reportedly making fraudulent returns. The employee “would find a cash purchase, and then make a return for the merchandise, and take the cash for the return.” Store records showed the worker allegedly took about $3,800 in returns and stolen merchandise. The employee reportedly wrote a statement and told the loss prevention officer the thefts began in December 2017.   [Source: The Register-Mail]

Woman arrested for shoplifting dog collar earns felony charge for carrying pills

A woman who was already wanted in Stafford, Virginia, picked up a new felony charge Wednesday after she was arrested for trying to steal a dog collar and other items from a county Walmart, police said. Serena Marie Ball, 46, of Locust Grove was charged with possession of a controlled substance after Percocet that she didn’t have a prescription for was found on her following her arrest, Stafford Sheriff’s spokeswoman Amanda Vicinanzo said. Ball was also charged with misdemeanor larceny. According to police, Deputy Dominic Torrice went to the Walmart in response to a reported shoplifting. A loss prevention associate told Torrice that a woman had opened a bag of dog bones and stuffed some in her pockets and removed a tag from a shirt and placed it on a dog collar. Store surveillance video showed that the woman had failed to pay for just under $40 worth of items in the self-checkout line, Vicinanzo said. Police said the suspect became belligerent when taken into custody, continually screaming and claiming she was injured. Medical personnel were called to the scene and determined that the woman was not injured. At the Rappahannock Regional Jail, the dog collar was recovered among her belongings, along with the pills. Ball was wanted in Stafford Circuit Court for skipping a court appearance late last year. She is charged with DUI, 3rd offense, which is also a felony.  [Source: The Free Lance-Star]

Trust in Facebook has spectacularly nosedived after its enormous data breach

Trust in Facebook has spectacularly collapsed after the consulting firm Cambridge Analytica was revealed to have improperly accessed data from as many as 87 million users. A survey of 3,000 people by the Ponemon Institute, a US think tank, reported by the Financial Times, showed that users were significantly more skeptical than they were last year that Facebook would handle their personal information with care. In the week after the former Cambridge Analytica staffer Christopher Wylie’s revelations about the data breach, just 27% of respondents to the Ponemon study agreed with the statement “Facebook is committed to protecting the privacy of my personal information.” This was a substantial drop from the 79% of people who agreed with the statement in 2017. The findings support Business Insider Intelligence’s 2018 Digital Trust survey, which found that 81% of Facebook users have little to no confidence in the company to protect their data and privacy. These fears were considerably more pronounced for Facebook than they were for Instagram, LinkedIn, Snapchat, Twitter, and YouTube. Ponemon has been polling US Facebook users for most of the past decade, according to the FT. It said some respondents were particularly upset the company had not informed them of the Cambridge Analytica data breach in 2015, when Facebook learned of it. “They put Facebook on such a high pedestal that the bottom is more painful,” Ponemon’s chairman, Larry Ponemon, told the Financial Times. Business Insider has contacted the think tank for the full results of its survey.   [Source: Business Insider]

The post Breaking News in the Industry: April 18, 2018 appeared first on LPM.

Breaking News in the Industry: April 17, 2018

Sheriffs bust ring selling stolen cigarettes

A multi-jurisdictional operation involving state and local law enforcement agencies and prosecutors in Tampa, Florida, shut down a major stolen cigarette operation that spanned 20 counties. On April 12, Hillsborough County Special Investigations Division detectives, with the assistance of district patrol units, concluded a month-long investigation into stores illegally purchasing stolen cigarettes in Hillsborough County. Detectives were able to obtain probable cause for search warrants at 15 stores and 18 arrest warrants. During Operation Up in Smoke, undercover detectives sold 170 cartons of cigarettes to the various stores and received $3,620 as payment for the cigarettes. The true retail value of the cartons sold was $10,880. “Shutting down this illegal cigarette ring levels the playing field for businesses who do the right thing by following the law and complying with our regulations.

This is a win for everyone.” said Hillsborough County Sheriff Chad Chronister. Detectives served the court-authorized search warrants and seized the following items: approximately $60,000, four firearms, marijuana, synthetic marijuana, 142 stolen packs of cigarettes (sold by detectives) and miscellaneous paraphernalia. The marijuana was found in various forms, including plant material, oils, creams, edibles, and capsules. A total of 15 people were arrested as a result of this operation. An outstanding warrant remains for Jihad Nawabeet, who is a clerk at Snack Attack Store, in Tampa. Also participating in Operation Up in Smoke were the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, the Office of the Florida Attorney General, the Hillsborough County State Attorney’s Office, the Pasco County Sheriff’s Office and the Florida Division of Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco. All together, these agencies made 17 arrests on 135 separate charges.  [Source: The Tampa Patch]

Fireworks distraction thieves hit jewelry store in mall [Viral Video]

In this case Miami-Dade police say it led to a “grand theft” at the Mayors Jewelers inside the sprawling Dadeland mall . It was about 6:30 p.m. when a man went into the jewelry store and asked an employee to show him an expensive watch, police said. “Once the subject had the watch in his possession, an unknown person set off fireworks in the vicinity of the store,” said Miami-Dade Police Detective Argemis Colome. The thief used the distraction to take off with the watch, Colome said. As shoppers ran from the area there were some minor injuries, police said. None of the injuries were related to the fireworks. Police did not provide a description of the watch that was stolen or indicate its worth. This is at least the third time in recent months that fireworks were used in Florida to cause a panic among shoppers so thieves could make a getaway. On New Year’s Eve, at the Zales Outlet jewelry store at Sawgrass Mills mall, a man stole an $11,400 Rolex watch after someone set off fireworks a few feet from the store’s entrance. And in Central Florida on April 8, 11 people were hurt, according to the Orange County Sheriff’s Office, when thieves used firecrackers at the Florida Mall to simulate gunshots. That incident was also a theft at a jewelry store, the sheriff’s office said.  [Source: SunSentinal]

Kansas man jailed after pulling knife on asset protection associate

Law enforcement authorities are investigating a suspect after an altercation with a store asset protection associate. Just after 11a.m. Sunday, police were dispatched to the Target store in Topeka, Kansas, where an AP associate attempted to stop a suspected shoplifter, according to Lt. Kelvin Johnson. During the incident, the alleged shoplifter attempted to punch the AP associate and then pulled a knife and ran north with the items he had taken from the store. A witness kept an eye on the suspect until police arrived. Following a brief foot pursuit, police captured the suspect identified as 29-year-old Casey J. St. John. He was booked into the Shawnee County Department of Corrections for Aggravated Robbery and Felony Obstruction, according to Johnson. The asset protection associate was not injured during the incident. A witness kept an eye on the suspect until police arrived. Following a brief foot pursuit, police captured the suspect identified as 29-year-old Casey J. St. John. He was booked into the Shawnee County Department of Corrections for Aggravated Robbery and Felony Obstruction, according to Johnson. The asset protection associate was not injured during the incident.  [Source: Hays Post]

Deputies searching for shoplifters accused of pointing pistol at LPA

The Sheriff’s Office Violent Crimes Unit in Harris County, Texas, is searching for two Kohl’s robbers accused of pointing a pistol at a loss prevention associate. According to police, a man and woman were shoplifting at a Kohl’s store in the 7100 block of the Barker Cypress when loss prevention associates noticed them hiding items in the bottom of a shopping cart. When the associates approached the two shoplifters they ran out of the store and pointed a pistol at the LP associates. The shoplifters were last scene driving away in a light blue and silver GMC pickup truck. The man is described as being 5 feet, 11 inches tall and weighing 180 pounds. The woman is described as being 5 feet, 7 inches tall and weighing 150 pounds. Crime Stoppers may pay up to $5,000 for information leading to the charging and/or arrest of the suspect in this case. Information may be reported by calling 713-222-TIPS (8477).   [Source: CW39 NewsFix]

Twin sisters arrested at for shoplifting

On April 1, officer Walter Larson was called to Walmart in Warwick, Rhodes Island, for a report of two women shoplifting, discovered they were twins, and arrested them both. Larson arrived at store and spoke with the manager, who told him he had observed two women, twins, later identified as Jessica Norberg, 38, and her twin sister, Jamie Nordberg, enter the store, according to Larson’s report. The loss prevention manager said the twins walked throughout the store, selecting a large amount of merchandise from each department, paying for some, but not all, at the register before leaving with the stolen items on their person, Larson reported. The LP manager confronted the women after they left the store without paying for the merchandise, and the women agreed to return to the manager’s office without incident. Inside the store, the stolen merchandise was assessed, with Jessica credited with stealing $423 and the other woman, Jamie, with stealing $277.30 from the store. Larson discovered that Jessica had an outstanding warrant for failing to appear in court, and Jaime had no prior arrests. The women were each scheduled in Third District Court for May 8.  [Source: Warwick Post]

Suspect pleads out in retail fraud case

A Branch County, Michigan, man arrested in connection with a Feb. 25 retail fraud at the Jonesville Walmart appeared in Hillsdale County District Court Wednesday morning for a probable cause conference. Nicholas Lynn Gigowski, 37, was arrested April 2 by the Hillsdale County Sheriff’s Office on a felony warrant charging him with first degree retail fraud and conspiracy to commit first degree retail fraud. On Wednesday morning, Gigowski pleaded guilty to second degree retail fraud, a one year misdemeanor, in a plea bargain arranged with the Hillsdale County Prosecutor’s Office who agreed to dismiss the more serious offense. “I was shopping with the intention not to pay,” Gigowski said. Gigowski admitted to Hillsdale County District Judge Sara S. Lisznyai that he and another man “shopped” for over two hours, placing around $1,000 worth of merchandise into a shopping cart. Gigowski further claimed that when the shopping spree was over, he and he alone pushed the cart full of merchandise out of an emergency exit door. “I acted on my own,” Gigowski said. “I pushed it out the emergency exit door.” Gigowski will appear back in district court for sentencing in May after a pre-sentence investigation report is completed. The man that was with Gigowski has yet to be charged in connection with the crime. Lisznyai also granted Gigowski’s request for a bond reduction to $10,000 with 10 percent allowed; he was previously being held on a $40,000 bond with 10 percent allowed.  [Source: Hillsdale Daily News]

The post Breaking News in the Industry: April 17, 2018 appeared first on LPM.

People on the Move: April 2018 Loss Prevention Personnel Transitions

Professional advancement and building a successful loss prevention career can mean many things to many different people. For some, it may mean reaching a top leadership position at a particular company, perhaps serving as a director or VP of loss prevention/asset protection. For others, it may involve gaining experience in multiple professional fields in order to establish a unique and versatile role that capitalizes on various skill sets.

Some aspire to be the very best at a particular skill or discipline, building a base of knowledge and expertise that sets us apart from the rest. There are those who strive to leave a professional legacy, a lasting mark on the present and future of the loss prevention industry. Still others simply want the recognition that comes with reaching a particular level of performance and the security that it provides.

.inline-text-ad h1, .inline-text-ad h2, .inline-text-ad h3 { margin-top: 0; } .inline-text-ad h1 { font-size: 18px !important; font-weight: bold !important; } .inline-text-ad p { font-size: 1.0rem; } .inline-text-ad { border-top: 1px dotted #cccccc; border-bottom: 1px dotted #cccccc; padding-top: 20px; } @media only screen and (max-width: 768px) { .inline-text-ad { text-align: center; } .inline-text-ad h1, .inline-text-ad h3, .inline-text-ad h3 { font-size: 1.15em; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 460px) { .inline-text-ad h1, .inline-text-ad h3, .inline-text-ad h3 { font-size: 1em; } } Want an awesome LP career? Download this FREE Special Report, How to Find the Best Loss Prevention Jobs and Build a Successful Loss Prevention Career.

There are many ways to evaluate our career vision and professional aspirations for loss prevention personnel. But what is most important is that we find the path that fits us best. We need to fashion and follow a professional development plan that leads us forward and builds our future, especially when involved in a profession that is evolving as quickly as retail loss prevention.

All of us in the LP community are proud of the accomplishments of those who have worked hard and earned a new place along the loss prevention career path. Please join us in congratulating the following loss prevention personnel on their recent career moves and promotions.

April 2018

Christopher Perry is now corporate asset protection manager at CKE Restaurants.

Jeannie Tatis is now a regional logistics loss prevention manager at Amazon.

Rachel Sultan is now a district asset protection manager at JCPenney.

John Baschoff is now a market asset protection manager at Sam’s Club.

David Gibson was promoted to corporate investigations supervisor at Neiman Marcus.

Jeremy Douglas was promoted to area loss prevention manager at Belk.

Joe Nekic was named head of loss prevention – Southern Gulf at M. H. Alshaya Co. (United Arab Emirates).

Julie Saitta was promoted to senior loss prevention investigator at DSW.

Bobby DeAgostino was promoted to senior director, safety and loss prevention at Floor & Décor.

Scott McEntyre was promoted to supply chain loss prevention manager at DICK’S Sporting Goods.

Bryan Windham is now a district loss prevention manager at Home Goods.

Chad Fischer, LPC was promoted to manager of investigations and safety at The TJX Companies.

Aaron Henderson, LPC, CFI, was promoted to vice president loss prevention and food safety at Penske Logistics.

Renee Flores was promoted to chief operating officer at Gristedes/Red Apple Group.

Inder Minhas is now a regional loss prevention specialist at Shoppers Drug Mart.

Lance Williams was named vice president of loss prevention at Variety Wholesalers, Inc.

Patricia Ishmael is now an area loss prevention manager at HMSHost.

Henry Johnson, CFI is now a regional loss prevention manager at Amazon.

Will Rutty is now a senior market asset protection manager at REI.

Alisha Crosier was promoted to area asset protection manager at JCPenney.

Luis A. Banuelos is now a regional asset protection manager at Orchard Supply Hardware.

Jeanne Songy is now project manager – loss prevention technology at Gap.

Matt Braun was promoted to director of anti-corruption compliance at L Brands.

Chester Blair was promoted to senior area loss prevention manager at Ross Stores, Inc.

Catherine Stasiowski was promoted to director, loss prevention and safety at Total Wine & More.

Shawn Abbott was promoted to director of asset protection technology at Stein Mart.

Joe Oliveira has been named director of asset protection at The Fresh Market.

Brian Huff, CPP was named director of loss prevention at rue21.

Pamela Velose was named vice president of loss prevention at Belk.

Jason Alexander is now a regional asset protection manager at BJ’s Wholesale Club.

Nicole Garcea, CFI is now a regional asset protection manager at BJ’s Wholesale Club.

James O’Brien was promoted to senior learning specialist at Nordstrom.

Andrew Wallace is now manager of corporate investigations – loss prevention operations at Neiman Marcus.

Ryan Krajewski is now a regional profit protection manager at JD Sports Fashion.

Kenny Douglas is now a regional loss prevention manager at Amazon.

Audrey Kohler was promoted to market organized retail crime manager at Lowe’s.

Mark Hernandez was promoted to corporate manager of investigations at The Home Depot.

Lindsay Canup was promoted to area loss prevention manager at Belk.

William Bednarz is now a regional asset protection manager at Food Lion.

Zebulon Strickland was promoted to organized retail crime investigator at Safeway.

Michael Cote was promoted to regional loss prevention manager at The TJX Companies.

Omar Lara was promoted to manager of corporate security and fire/life safety at Ross Stores.

Michala Serbousek was promoted to loss prevention systems administrator at Sephora.

Keith Johnson was promoted to regional loss prevention manager at Citi Trends.

Michael Simpson, LPC is now an area asset protection manager at JCPenney.

Brett Szrejna is now a regional asset protection manager at BJ’s Wholesale Club.

James Hart, CFI was promoted to district loss prevention manager at The TJX Companies.

Jordan Shelest was promoted to district loss prevention manager at TJX Canada.

David Vanoni was promoted to senior district loss prevention manager at Sephora.

Corey Seltz was promoted to compliance, safety, and asset protection operations manager – import flow at Walmart Distribution Center.

Brad Swain is now an area loss prevention manager at Ulta Beauty.

Matt Garlich, PSP was promoted to corporate loss prevention and security manager at Chico’s FAS.

Jason Anderson, LPC is now a district asset protection leader at CVS Health.

Scott Preuit was promoted to regional loss prevention manager at Old Navy.

Courtney Meek was promoted to senior manager, LP operations at Ross Stores.

Derek Fuentes was promoted to senior divisional manager of compliance, safety, and asset protection at Walmart Supply Chain.

Kelly Sanders is now a regional loss prevention manager at Athleta.

Donna Gudridge was named client program manager – NAM at Sekura Global.

Elena Mencos, CFI, CFE is now an area asset protection manager at DTLR, Inc.

Daniel Molloy was promoted to group shrink and security manager at Tesco (UK).

Andy Santiago, CFI is now an area asset protection manager at Walmart Logistics.

Alexander Ocasio, M.S. is now a district asset protection manager at Rite Aid.

Sonya Medlock, LPC is now a district asset protection manager at Walgreens.

Todd Budovsky is now a district asset protection manager at Walgreens.

Samuel “Bo” White, LPC is now a senior regional loss prevention and safety manager at Office Depot.

Jerry West is now an ORC investigator at Publix.

James Doss was promoted to market ORC manager at Lowe’s.

Review the March 2018 “People on the Move.”

Many of the loss prevention / asset protection career moves and promotions are reported to us by our career advisor partners. We are grateful for their collective efforts and diligence in delivering this information. If you would like to provide information pertaining to a recent promotion or career move that is not listed here, please send your submissions to peopleonthemove (at) lpportal (dot) com.

This post was originally published in 2017 and is updated regularly. 

The post People on the Move: April 2018 Loss Prevention Personnel Transitions appeared first on LPM.

LP Magazine Survey: Have you ever been assaulted when attempting to detain a shoplifter?

As part of last week’s LP Insider survey, we debated whether a loss prevention associate used excessive force in an encounter with a 16-year-old girl accused of shoplifting.

According to police, when the loss prevention representative approached two female teenagers as they allegedly attempted to leave the store with stolen merchandise, one of the teenagers began kicking and punching the loss prevention representative, later biting him on the chest, before being taken to the ground as the loss prevention representative attempted to subdue the alleged shoplifter. The other teenager fled the scene.

The majority of those surveyed believed that the LP representative’s actions were justified based on the situation. Others believed that the LP representative should have allowed the shoplifter to leave when she resisted, and there were also a few respondents that felt that the actions of the LP representative were inappropriate.

While there may be some debate over how this particular situation was handled by the LP representative, another critical aspect of the incident involved the assault of the LP representative as he attempted to detain the shoplifter

The nature of the apprehension process always has the potential to lead to volatile situations. Yet despite employee training and company policies intended to mitigate these situations, incidents still occur on a regular and consistent basis that involve the assault of loss prevention professionals during the apprehension process—some leading to tragic results. Even for the most seasoned professionals, when shoplifters are faced with the threat of detainment and potential criminal charges, emotions can run high and individuals can be unpredictable.

Regardless of our current positions, most of those in loss prevention still have roots as representatives apprehending shoplifters. Has it ever happened to you?

In this week’s LP Magazine Survey, we’re asking:


We look forward to your insights and opinions! Please feel free to candidly share your thoughts. All responses to the survey will remain anonymous.

Look for the results of the survey to appear in next Monday’s LP Insider.

The post LP Magazine Survey: Have you ever been assaulted when attempting to detain a shoplifter? appeared first on LPM.

People on the Move: April 2018

Professional advancement and building a successful loss prevention career can mean many things to many different people. For some individuals, it may mean reaching a top leadership position at a particular company, perhaps serving as a director or vice president of loss prevention/asset protection. For others, it may involve gaining experience in multiple professional fields in order to establish a unique and versatile role that capitalizes on all of our various skill sets.

Some aspire to be the best at a particular skill or discipline, building a base of knowledge and expertise that sets us apart from the rest. There are those who strive to leave a professional legacy, leaving a lasting mark on the present and future of the loss prevention industry. And there are still others who simply want the recognition that comes with reaching a particular level of performance and the security that it provides.

.inline-text-ad h1, .inline-text-ad h2, .inline-text-ad h3 { margin-top: 0; } .inline-text-ad h1 { font-size: 18px !important; font-weight: bold !important; } .inline-text-ad p { font-size: 1.0rem; } .inline-text-ad { border-top: 1px dotted #cccccc; border-bottom: 1px dotted #cccccc; padding-top: 20px; } @media only screen and (max-width: 768px) { .inline-text-ad { text-align: center; } .inline-text-ad h1, .inline-text-ad h3, .inline-text-ad h3 { font-size: 1.15em; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 460px) { .inline-text-ad h1, .inline-text-ad h3, .inline-text-ad h3 { font-size: 1em; } } Want an awesome LP career? Download this FREE Special Report, How to Find the Best Loss Prevention Jobs and Build a Successful Loss Prevention Career.

There are many different ways to evaluate our career vision and professional aspirations. But what is most important is that we find the path that fits us best. We need to fashion and follow a professional development plan that leads us forward and builds our future. Especially when involved in a profession that is evolving as quickly as retail loss prevention, career growth is essential to professional survival. Whatever our professional goals and aspirations might be; whatever skills and experiences have helped forge our personal loss prevention career path, we have to find and seize the opportunities to learn, grow, and progress.

All of us throughout the loss prevention community are proud of the accomplishments of those that have worked hard and earned a new place along the loss prevention career path. Please join us in congratulating the following individuals on their recent career moves and promotions.

April 2018

John Baschoff is now a market asset protection manager at Sam’s Club

David Gibson was promoted to corporate investigations supervisor at Neiman Marcus

Jeremy Douglas was promoted to area loss prevention manager at Belk

Joe Nekic was named head of loss prevention – Southern Gulf at M. H. Alshaya Co. (United Arab Emirates)

Julie Saitta was promoted to senior loss prevention investigator at DSW

Bobby DeAgostino was promoted to senior director, safety and loss prevention at Floor & Décor

Scott McEntyre was promoted to supply chain loss prevention manager at DICK’S Sporting Goods

Bryan Windham is now a district loss prevention manager at Home Goods

Chad Fischer, LPC was promoted to manager of investigations and safety at The TJX Companies

Aaron Henderson, LPC, CFI was promoted to vice president loss prevention and food safety at Penske Logistics  Click here to learn more

Renee Flores was promoted to chief operating officer at Gristedes/Red Apple Group

Inder Minhas is now a regional loss prevention specialist at Shoppers Drug Mart

Lance Williams was named vice president of loss prevention at Variety Wholesalers, Inc.  Click here to learn more

Patricia Ishmael is now an area loss prevention manager at HMSHost

Henry Johnson, CFI is now a regional loss prevention manager at Amazon

Will Rutty is now a senior market asset protection manager at REI

Alisha Crosier was promoted to area asset protection manager at JCPenney

Luis A. Banuelos is now a regional asset protection manager at Orchard Supply Hardware

Jeanne Songy is now project manager – loss prevention technology at Gap

Matt Braun was promoted to director of anti-corruption compliance at L Brands

Chester Blair was promoted to senior area loss prevention manager at Ross Stores, Inc.

Catherine Stasiowski was promoted to director, loss prevention & safety at Total Wine & More  Click here to learn more

Shawn Abbott was promoted to director of asset protection technology at Stein Mart

Joe Oliveira has been named director of asset protection at The Fresh Market  Click here to learn more

Brian Huff, CPP was named director of loss prevention at rue21  Click here to learn more

Pamela Velose was named vice president of loss prevention at Belk  Click here to learn more

Jason Alexander is now a regional asset protection manager at BJ’s Wholesale Club

Nicole Garcea, CFI is now a regional asset protection manager at BJ’s Wholesale Club

James O’Brien was promoted to senior learning specialist at Nordstrom

Andrew Wallace is now manager of corporate investigations – loss prevention operations at Neiman Marcus

Ryan Krajewski is now a regional profit protection manager at JD Sports Fashion

Kenny Douglas is now a regional loss prevention manager at Amazon

Audrey Kohler was promoted to market organized retail crime manager at Lowe’s

Mark Hernandez was promoted to corporate manager of investigations at The Home Depot

Lindsay Canup was promoted to area loss prevention manager at Belk

William Bednarz is now a regional asset protection manager at Food Lion

Zebulon Strickland was promoted to organized retail crime investigator at Safeway

Michael Cote was promoted to regional loss prevention manager at The TJX Companies

Omar Lara was promoted to manager of corporate security & fire/life safety at Ross Stores

Michala Serbousek was promoted to loss Prevention systems administrator at Sephora

Keith Johnson was promoted to regional loss prevention manager at Citi Trends

Michael Simpson, LPC is now an area asset protection manager at JCPenney

Brett Szrejna is now a regional asset protection manager at BJ’s Wholesale Club

James Hart, CFI was promoted to district loss prevention manager at The TJX Companies

Jordan Shelest was promoted to district loss prevention manager at TJX Canada

David Vanoni was promoted to senior district loss prevention manager at Sephora

Corey Seltz was promoted to compliance, safety, and asset protection operations manager – import flow at Walmart Distribution Center

Brad Swain is now an area loss prevention manager at Ulta Beauty

Matt Garlich, PSP was promoted to corporate loss prevention and security manager at Chico’s FAS

Jason Anderson, LPC is now a district asset protection leader at CVS Health

Scott Preuit was promoted to regional loss prevention manager at Old Navy

Courtney Meek was promoted to senior manager, LP operations at Ross Stores

Derek Fuentes was promoted to senior divisional manager of compliance, safety, and asset protection at Walmart Supply Chain

Kelly Sanders is now a regional loss prevention manager at Athleta

Donna Gudridge named client program manager – NAM at Sekura Global  Click here to learn more

Elena Mencos, CFI, CFE is now an area asset protection manager at DTLR, Inc.

Daniel Molloy was promoted to group shrink and security manager at Tesco (UK)

Andy Santiago, CFI is now an area asset protection manager at Walmart Logistics

Alexander Ocasio, M.S. is now a district asset protection manager at Rite Aid

Sonya Medlock, LPC is now a district asset protection manager at Walgreens

Todd Budovsky is now a district asset protection manager at Walgreens

Samuel “Bo” White, LPC is now a senior regional Loss Prevention and Safety at Office Depot

Jerry West is now an ORC investigator at Publix

James Doss was promoted to market ORC manager at Lowe’s

Review the March 2018 “People on the Move.”

Many of the loss prevention / asset protection career moves and promotions are reported to us by our career advisor partners. We are grateful for their collective efforts and diligence in delivering this information. If you would like to provide information pertaining to a recent promotion or career move that is not listed below, please email submissions to peopleonthemove (at) lpportal (dot) com.

The post People on the Move: April 2018 appeared first on LPM.

Breaking News in the Industry: April 16, 2018

Police seize $700,000 in feces-infected counterfeit cosmetics

Kim Kardashian West said it best: “SO GROSS!” That’s what the reality TV star Tweeted Friday after Los Angeles police announced they had seized $700,000 in counterfeit cosmetics in a raid, including makeup that tested positive for high levels of bacteria and human feces. The department’s piracy unit raided 21 targets in the city’s downtown Fashion District on Thursday, police said. The raid led to six arrests on trademark violation charges. Police also issued cease and desist orders to more than a dozen businesses. The raid was conducted with help from the FBI following complaints about makeup triggering skin problems, NBC Los Angeles reports. “Busted!” Los Angeles Police Captain Mark Reina said on Twitter, sharing pictures of the cosmetics police were after in the seizure. “The best price is not always the best deal!” Cosmetics seized included fake version of brands like Mac, Naked, Anastasia, Too Faced, Naked and Kylie —explaining West’s horrified Tweet. West wrote on Twitter that lip kits from her sister Kylie Jenner’s cosmetic imprint were among the trove of counterfeits. Detective Rick Ishitani told KTLA that, in addition to taking fake cosmetics off the street, the goal of the raid was to “educate the public of the health and safety concerns of purchasing counterfeit cosmetics.” West may have most succinctly captured the moral of the story, though. “Never buy counterfeit products!” she wrote on Twitter.  [Source: The Sacramento Bee]

Man in brawl at mall says he was wrongly accused of shoplifting [Viral Video]

A man at the center of a brawl inside the Apple Store at Baybrook Mall in Houston, Texas,  said that the whole thing was a misunderstanding.

 Julio Gonzalez told ABC13 the fight broke out over an Apple headset on Tuesday night.

”It’s just a misunderstanding,” Gonzalez said. “It’s just messed up that it happened.” Gonzalez said he placed a headset on top of his baby’s stroller as he pushed it inside the store.

He told us that he gave the stroller to his girlfriend when Apple called him up for his appointment and that she walked out, not realizing the headphones were on the stroller’s canopy.

That’s when the confrontation broke out.

”I’m like, ‘Hey, hey, hold up, this is a misunderstanding, I haven’t left the store, I’m inside,'” Gonzalez said.

 He claims a loss prevention associate in a red shirt grabbed the headphones with unnecessary force, slamming the box down through the canopy of the stroller, striking his son. Apple wouldn’t answer specific questions about what happened, but say the man in the red shirt who is seen in the video fighting with Gonzalez is not one of their loss prevention associates. Mall officials referred ABC13 to police. 

Neither Gonzalez nor his girlfriend were arrested for theft. However, his girlfriend was arrested for alleged possession of cocaine, which she says the alleged loss prevention associate found in her purse.

The couple is now asking if that search was legal or if her civil rights were violated.  [Source: ABC13 Eyewitness News]

Woman charged with endangering child, assaulting officer following theft

A woman is facing multiple charges, including assaulting an officer and endangering a child, after trying to steal from a Kohl’s in Overland Park, Kansas. According to the police, Danielle Wilson was trying to steal $830 worth of clothes from Kohl’s when loss prevention spotted her and called the police. An officer arrived as the 25-year-old was getting into her car with the stolen items and he tried to block her from behind, but she reversed anyway and smashed into him and a minivan. She had a 2-year-old child with her, and there was also another woman with her… No one was hurt. Wilson was taken into custody has already been charged with aggravated assault on a law enforcement officer, endangering a child, two counts of criminal damage, and theft. One of the counts of criminal damage is related to the police vehicle, but the other is related to damage that was done to the 2014 Toyota minivan.“We do see this a lot in Overland Park,” said John Lacy with the Overland Park Police Department. “Sometimes they’ll bring a child with them to distract the loss prevention associate but, in this case, the loss prevention associate was watching these two ladies and they were stealing items and things of that sort, and when he started chasing after them, they just picked up the child and then started running.”  Wilson was being held in the Johnson County jail on a $25,000 bond but has since bonded out.A woman is facing multiple charges, including assaulting an officer and endangering a child, after trying to steal from a Kohl’s in Overland Park. [Source: KCTV5 News]

Jewelry store manager charged with stealing from employer

An Urbana, Illinois, woman who allegedly stole thousands of dollars from her employer was released from jail Friday after being charged with felony theft. Diamond Smith, 24 was charged Friday with the theft of $4,319 from the Rogers & Hollands Jewelers store at Market Place Mall, where she was a manager. Champaign police arrested her there Thursday. The charge alleges Smith took cash home from the business. She told police she intended to deposit it in the bank the next day. However, store officials could find no record of a deposit for the Feb. 14 business receipts. Assistant State’s Attorney Will Lynch said Smith told Champaign police that she was sure she deposited the money on Feb. 15 and that the bank must not have made a proper record of the transaction. Judge John Kennedy allowed Smith to be released on her own recognizance and set her next court date for April 27 to give her time to hire her own attorney. If convicted of the theft, she faces penalties ranging from probation to two to five years in prison.   [Source: The Daily Gazette]

Shoplifters led police on chase through traffic

Two shoplifters led police on a chase that criss-crossed Connecticut Avenue several times Thursday afternoon before one of them was taken into custody and found with stolen items tucked into a girdle, police said. Diego Salamanca-Garzon, 32, of Queens, N.Y. was charged with interfering with an officer, fifth-degree larceny, conspiracy to commit fifth-degree larceny, third-degree criminal mischief and illegal use of a highway by a pedestrian. Around 2 p.m. an officer who was monitoring Connecticut Avenue traffic observed two men run across the road without any apparent regard for traffic, instead looking over their shoulders. The officer activated lights and sirens and attempted to stop the men as they ran toward the entrance of Stop & Shop. Upon seeing the officer, police said the men changed direction and ran back across Connecticut Avenue through traffic toward ShopRite. The officer called dispatch to request additional officers and drove back across the road. The officer was stopped by a loss prevention associate at TJ Maxx, who pointed in the direction of the two men. The TJ Maxx LP associate told police the men were observed using a security tag removal tool to take off tags before putting allegedly-stolen items of clothing under their own clothes. Police said the pair also placed the security tags on other items of clothing, thus damaging them. Police said the men dropped the stolen items in the ShopRite parking lot during the chase. The officer caught up to Salamanca-Garzon in the parking lot. Police said he ignored commands to stop before he was tackled and brought to the ground by the officer. Police said the pair was working as a team. They were observed by employees and on video communicating with one another via Bluetooth devices and cell phones and helping one another stash the clothing. The second suspect was not located. Police said they are reviewing clear video images of the man. Salamanca-Garzon’s cell phone was confiscated as evidence. The total amount of items recovered from the parking lot was $591.82. Eleven other articles of clothing were damaged totaling nearly $100. While at headquarters, police said they recovered five additional items totaling $98 tucked inside a woman’s girdle that Salamanca-Garzon was wearing.  [Source: The Hour]

Mattel closes New York office after Toys R Us liquidation

Mattel’s financial health rating (FHR) tanked in 2017, dropping from 65 to 27 year over year, suggesting an over-reliance on Toys R Us (whose woes came to a head in 2017). Regardless, the toy maker’s struggle warns other companies against single sourcing or become too codependent on certain links in the supply chain. According to RapidRatings‘ analysis, Mattel poses a high risk of default in the next few years. Granted, the toy maker is trying to get back on track — hence the $650 million cost savings plan. Mattel CFO Joe Euteneuer said in February the plan will be implemented “primarily through process simplification and the optimization of SG&A, cost of goods sold and advertising, while the larger more structural changes like our manufacturing footprint and investment in IP will drive most of the remaining savings in 2019.” Closing the New York office is likely part of “process simplification,” but such vague statements leave Mattel open to pull all kinds of punches without its customers really knowing what to expect. As RapidRatings report notes, Mattel’s net profitability and operating profitability are very poor and its cash flow was negative in 2017, so maybe shuttering offices and slimming operations is what the toy maker needs to do to stay afloat.  [Source: SupplyChainDIVE]

The post Breaking News in the Industry: April 16, 2018 appeared first on LPM.

Accused Shoplifter Who Died in Grocery Store Scuffle Identified

A man died Saturday following an incident at a Stop & Shop in Brooklyn, New York in what witnesses describe as an attempt to hold an accused shoplifter. Witnesses told CBS2 51-year-old Ralph Nimmons came into the store on Flatbush Avenue around 7:30 a.m. and was suspected of shoplifting. Customers said one minute, store employees were sitting on him; the next, first responders were rushing in to administer CPR. Police said when officers arrived, they found Nimmons lying on the floor unconscious and unresponsive. On Sunday, Stop and Shop issued a statement on the incident: “We are saddened by the death that occurred at our Flatbush Avenue store on Saturday morning. Our deepest sympathies go out to the family. We continue to cooperate with law enforcement officials to ensure that the facts pertaining to this incident are fully and accurately determined.”Witnesses described the scene to Rozner. “He was just saying, ‘let me go, let me go, let me go,’” said one woman. “But then when he was on the ground, he said that he couldn’t breathe and he had a heart problem.” “I saw this guy laying on the floor, and there was a man over him – sitting over him,” said another witness. Another customer told Rozner a female bystander stepped in and offered to pay. “She asked, ‘What’s going on? What happened? He stole something?’

He’s like, ‘I didn’t do nothing.’ And she pulled out her money to pay for whatever they said he stole, but they wouldn’t take her money. So they wrestled him and he didn’t want, he wasn’t trying to be held, he was trying to get out,” said Jacene McDonald. Flatbush resident Christina Hutchinson says she often saw Nimmons on the sidewalk of the block where she lives. “This is insane,” she told CBS2’s Dave Carlin. “There’s nothing there that valuable.” Nobody answered the door at Nimmons’ last known address on East 21st Street. On the block, he’s well known and described by some as homeless. “That’s not right for them to do something like that they could’ve pushed him out the store and told him not to come back,” Flatbush resident Melissa Drawhoren said. Some shoppers wished Nimmons had just asked for assistance. “I would have just pulled out two dollars from my pocket and given it to him to shop and see, I would have bought it for him and asked if he needed more money,” Bea Smith said. A pastor at the church across the street from the Stop & Shop say they’re praying for Nimmons and his family. “Their intentions weren’t to maybe harm him or anything,” Flatbush resident Alyssa Colon said. “They guy just wanted some cookies and they tackled him for it. The medical examiner is working to determine the cause of Nimmons’ death as police continue to investigate whether or not what happened to him constitutes a crime.  [Source: CBS New York]

The post Accused Shoplifter Who Died in Grocery Store Scuffle Identified appeared first on LPM.

ADT Brings Home “Installer of the Year” and “Integrated Installation of the Year” Awards for Commercial and Multi-Site Security at 23rd Annual Sammy Awards

ADT Inc., the leading provider of monitored security and interactive home and business automation solutions in the U.S. and Canada, was recently honored with two of the most prestigious awards in the security industry.

During the annual SAMMY Awards, held in Las Vegas, ADT was presented with both the Installer of the Year and Integrated Installation of the Year (Multi-Site Commercial) awards, earning the prestigious recognitions over the industry’s top players.

ADT continues to grow its Commercial business, both organically and through strategic acquisitions, by adding both capabilities and talent with a focus on national account and multi-site locations – all supported by nationwide resources that provide a personalized experience on a local level.

The new norm at ADT are solutions which cement our stellar reputation for great customer service like same-day service with Tech Tracker, dedicated national accounts operations center teams, and phone calls answered quickly by live attendants.

“As ADT continues growing our commercial security business, this tremendous recognition reflects the exemplary work of every ADT employee and Dealer who constantly strive to provide world class service to our customers” said ADT President Jim DeVries. “We are incredibly proud.”

Now in its 23rd year, the SAMMY (sales and marketing) Awards were created to recognize and honor best-in-class installing security dealers and integrators for their marketing, business, installation and overall excellence.

“With entries from security companies across the country, this year’s SAMMY competition was fierce,” said Scott Goldfine with Security Sales & Integration Magazine, the awards sponsor. “The winners represent the best of the best, and we congratulate ADT on their success.”

The recent SAMMY victory comes on the heels of ADT being named Dealer of the Year by SDM Magazine last December.

The post ADT Brings Home “Installer of the Year” and “Integrated Installation of the Year” Awards for Commercial and Multi-Site Security at 23rd Annual Sammy Awards appeared first on LPM.

Pages

HKLPA (@the_hklpa) Tweets

RT @NDDCEL: Ethics training is broken. Can #storytelling fix it? https://t.co/jSyvLL7HaT https://t.co/bWjHc5zQpV 4 weeks 15 hours ago
RT @EthicalSystems: "We are trying to give advice to organizations that are incredibly complex. When you put individuals together, they… https://t.co/Vs9bDKqorr 1 month 1 week ago
RT @sh_oldenberg: To Understand Complexity, Use 7 Dimensions of Ethical Thinking https://t.co/BAKgEWtIpk https://t.co/5LuaqJIiXc 2 months 1 week ago
RT @ComplianceXprts: 7 Things Every SME Exporter Needs To Know About Protecting Their Brand https://t.co/fpfGOQJQDw https://t.co/Z0VibE2IsB 2 months 2 weeks ago
RT @ComplianceXprts: Exporters Guide To Managing Compliance - Download our free ebook now!https://t.co/ypw6RwMrVE https://t.co/2NT9xereA7 2 months 2 weeks ago
RT @mikevolkov20: Episode 14 - What Every Compliance Officer Needs to Know About Data Privacy and the EU's GDPR - Corruption, Crime &… https://t.co/iZMjIPsBhs 3 months 3 weeks ago
RT @ComplianceXprts: What You Need To Know About Auditing And Risk Management In The Transport Industry https://t.co/IuMnS7mtgd 4 months 5 days ago
RT @EthicalSystems: Our 2017 End of Year Letter from @JonHaidt and @azishf https://t.co/ukjVe2Lqti "This is the time for the business… https://t.co/jUSNcY4gco 4 months 1 week ago
RT @ComplianceXprts: Inspection of Facilities and Sporting Venues - Due Diligence https://t.co/uKa3rYTJX0 https://t.co/EBXi6aBsW5 4 months 1 week ago
RT @ComplianceXprts: 14 Essentials For Your Compliance Management System https://t.co/FcQa8nRGWm https://t.co/Ru1oVnJelN 4 months 3 weeks ago